The History of the Labor Movement in the United States, Vol. 11: the great depression, 1929-1932

Author: Philip S. Foner

$19.99

This book radiates enlightenment for current struggles and encouragement for those fighting for a socialist future.

SKU: 9780717808670 Category: Barcode: 9780717808670.
ISBN: 9780717808670.

Description

In 1947, at the time of completing Volume I of the History of the Labor Movement in the United States, Foner reflected on the role of a Marxist historian of labor. Foner summed up the role this way: to present an “historical view which will enlighten our present struggles, will stimulate the foresight of labor’s thinkers and leaders, and give to the great mass of our workers the clarity, courage and determination to forge ahead for the attainment of their immediate ends, and for the accomplishment of the historical mission of the working class: the abolition of the exploitation of man by man.” In Volume XI Foner remained true to this goal. The book radiates enlightenment for current struggles and encouragement for those fighting for a socialist future.

Philip Foner completes his multi-volume U.S. labor history with the Great Depression

Additional information

Weight 16 oz
Dimensions 8.5 × 5.5 × .631 in

1 review for The History of the Labor Movement in the United States, Vol. 11: the great depression, 1929-1932

  1. Toni Gilpin

    The discovery of this addition to Philip Foner’s History of the Labor Movement in the United States should come as exciting news for both labor historians and union activists. In this volume Foner explores the misery and militancy of the early years of the Great Depression, providing richly detailed studies of resistance among garment workers in Newark, cigar makers in Tampa, auto workers in Detroit, pecan shellers in St. Louis, beet pickers in Colorado, and others in factories and fields across the United States. Foner focuses on high-stakes political efforts to secure relief for workers along with community-based, street-level actions like eviction protests and hunger marches. His attention to theory and practice, and to the widening ideological divisions within the labor movement during this turbulent period, should have resonance for those grappling with how to gain traction for unions today. As always Foner was especially attuned to the particular struggles waged by Blacks, women, and immigrant workers, and so this volume, written decades ago, still reads as revelatory and highly relevant.

    Toni Gilpin, author of The Long Deep Grudge: A Story of Big Capital, Radical Labor, and Class War in the American Heartland

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